Early tests ‘do not point out’ foot-and-mouth on Norfolk pig farm – Farmers Weekly


A suspected case of meals-and-mouth illness has seen a short lived management zone declared on the Norfolk-Suffolk border.

Defra says preliminary check outcomes do not point out the presence of foot-and-mouth – however additional tests are underneath method to rule it out.

The 10km-radius zone, which restricts the motion of vulnerable livestock, got here into impact at 10pm on Thursday (23 June).

See additionally: Breaking: Foot-and-mouth case suspected at Norfolk farm

It centres on a pig farm between the village of Hockwold-cum-Wilton in Norfolk and the market city of Brandon in Suffolk.

In a press release, Defra stated: “We are at present investigating a suspected case of foot-and-mouth illness in England.

“Movement restrictions and a 10km non permanent management zone have been put in place on the farm in Norfolk as a precaution.

Further work

“Preliminary testing does not point out the presence of illness, however additional work is now underneath method to absolutely rule it out.”

The zone is a precautionary measure that can stay pending full check outcomes.

Outgoing National Pig Association chief government Zoe Davies stated: “We are ready, conserving every thing crossed and praying it isn’t foot-and-mouth.”

Foot-and-mouth illness in pigs is indistinguishable from swine vesicular illness – so each are handled as suspected foot-and-mouth till tests show in any other case.

See additionally: Analysis: How good are foot-and-mouth controls?

Pigs hardly ever develop mouth blisters on account of foot-and-mouth, however typically they do seem on the snout, tongue and higher fringe of the hoof.

The principal signal of foot-and-mouth in pigs is sudden lameness, which can unfold rapidly among the many herd, alongside loud squealing.

Affected animals are inclined to lie down, are unwilling to maneuver and reluctant to feed.

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